Hoffmann, Hoffmann Line, Obituaries, Research, Swing

Catherine Marie Hoffmann Swing

Mrs. Catherine Swing

Called To Her Reward

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Mrs. Albert Swing passed away at her home on Brooks street last Sunday, after an illness of some time, the ailment finally being diagnosed as cancer of the stomach.

Mrs. Swing, with her husband and children, moved to this vicinity in 1909, for many years residing on the farm 1 3/4 miles southeast of town now occupied by Romeo Gudeman. They later purchased the farm in Hanging Grove township, Jasper county, now occupied by her son, Paul Swing, where her husband died about eight years ago. She continued to operate the farm until five years ago, when she purchased her home in town.

Catherine Hoffman was born in Remicourt, France, February 2, 1862, and was the daughter of Jacob and Anna Hoffman. She died at her home in Francesville, on Sunday, March 15, 1931, at the age of 69 years, 1 month and 13 days.

When but a small girl her parents moved to Vitrey, France, where she spent her girlhood. In 1881, she came to America, settling in Illinois.

She united with the Christian Apostolic church at the age of 21 years, remaining a true Christian and a wonderful mother to the end.

In 1884 she was married to Albert Swing, and they started farming near Fairbury, Illinois, later moving to near Cissna Park, Illinois, from where they moved to Wolcott, Indiana, in 1904.

To this union were born thirteen children: Mrs. Martha Slagel, Mrs. Lena Nussbaum and Albert Swing, of Fairbury, Illinois; Joe Swing, of near Hoopeston, Illinois; Mrs. Kathryn Shumaker, of Metamora, Illinois; Mrs. Anna Getz, of Tremont, Illinois; Mrs. May Kopka, and Charles and Paul Swing near Francesville, and Esther, Naomi and George Swing at home.

Besides her children, she leaves to mourn her loss 38 grandchildren, six sisters and five brothers, and a host of warm friends.

Funeral services were held Wednesday forenoon at the Christian Apostolic church, and a very large concourse of relatives and friends accompanied the remains to the cemetery east of town, where she was buried.

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Earth has lost its look of gladness,

Heaven seems to us more bright;

Since the spirit of our loved one

Took its happy homeward flight.

Oh, that dear one, how we loved her;

Oh, how hard to give her up,

But an angel came down for her,

And removed her from our flock.

Montgomery Line, Obituaries, Wilson

Carl Ozro Wilson

From Winner (South Dakota) Newspaper

Old Time Resident Dies of Heart Attack

This community was shocked Saturday morning about ten o’clock when it became known that Carl O. Wilson had sucumbed [sic] to a heart attack at his place of business.

Mr. Wilson was apparently in good health that morning, got up and partook of his usual breakfast, and remarked that he was feeling fine. He was manager in charge of the municipal liquor store here in Wood and was just entering his place of business when the final summons came.

Mr. Wilson was born February 8, 1886, at Creighton, Neb., and was therefore aged 53 year, four months, and one day when he answered the final summons of his Maker.  He lived with his parents there and on March 13, 1907, he was united in marriage to Miss Sophie Roberg, in Boone County, Nebraska.  To this union ten children were born, five sons and five daughters, two of the sons preceding him in death.  After his marriage he was baptized and confirmed in the Lutheran church in Newman Grove, Neb.
He and his wife made their home at Newman Grove, Neb., until the year 1915, when the family moved to Mellette county, taking up a homestead in the Bad Nation community northeast of Wood, and he had made Mellette county his home ever since.  In 1929 he moved to Wood and since that time he has been operating a restaurant for the greater part of time.  He was of a rather jovial disposition, and was a man who had a faculty of acquiring friends.  Less than a month ago he became manager of the first municipal liquor store here in Wood.

The deceased is survived by his widow, who for several years has been making her home at Witten, and five daughters, Mrs. Blanche Montgomery of Scottsbluff, Neb., Mrs. Percy Frainer [sic] of Ft. Pieere, [sic] S.D., Miss Mildred Wilson of Winner, Miss Irene of Sioux Falls, and Miss Maude of Witten, and three sons, Ozro and Clarence of Wood, and Lester of Witten.  He is also survived by two brothers, W.D. Hubbard of Baker, Mont. And Jerry Wilson of Sisseton, S.D., and three sisters, Mrs. Maude Carter of Pierre, Mrs. R.E. Raymaker of Missoula, Mont., and Mrs. Ross Walker of Polson, Mont.

Funeral services were held in the Paradise theatre in Wood at ten o’clock Tuesday morning, and the theatre was filled to capacity with friends of the deceased who came to pay their last respects to the departed one.  Rev. Wold of the Baptist church at Witten preached the funeral sermon, and sextette of girls furnished the music, with Mrs. Jessie McDonald at the piano.  There were many beautiful floral pieces that nearly covered the casket, the tributes of friends.  The remains were taken to Winner to be laid beside those of his son in the Winner cemetery.

Cemeteries, Hoffmann Line, Obituaries, Research, Slagel

Joseph Slagel

Death of Joseph Slagel (February 12, 1883 – September 5, 1915)

The remains of Joseph Slagel, a mention of whose death was made in this paper last week, arrived here from Miesse, N. M., last Friday Evening, and the funeral was held from the German Apostolic church Sunday afternoon, at one o’clock.  The funeral services were largely attended, a large number being present from the surrounding towns.  The remains were laid to rest int he Fairbury cemetery.

Joseph Slagel, son of Rev. and Mrs. Samuel Slagel, of this city, was born on the old home place, south of this city, Feb. 12, 1883, and passed away at the Ladies’ Hospital, Deming, N. M., Sept. 6, being at the time of his death aged 32 years, 6 months, and 24 days.  With the exception of a year spent at Miesse, N. M., he had lived in this vicinity practically all his life.  On May 24, 1906, he was united in marriage to Miss Emma Wagler.  They resided in this city up to about a year ago, Mr. Slagel conducting a machine shop on east Locust street.  Failing health, however, caused him to give up his business here, and he purchased a ranch near Miesse, several years ago, and in September of 1914, with his wife, went there to live.     During his life here, “Joe,” as he was familiarly known to his friends, had made a host of friends.  Always honest and upright, he held the esteem and respect of all who knew him, and in their hour of sadness the bereaved ones have the sympathy of the entire community.     Besides the bereaved wife and parents, he leaves one sister, Mrs. Emma Hoffman, and one brother, Daniel Slagel, both residing south of town, to mourn his loss.

Killed by Explosion of Prestolite Tank

The first word received here was to the effect that Mr. Slagel had been killed by the explosion of a shot gun, but such was not the case. The following letter, which we received from C. C. Hollenback, who formerly resided here, but who also moved to Miesse about a year ago, gives the particulars of the accident.  We received the letter last Friday but too late for publication.  The letter also tells of the high esteem in which he was held in that community. Miesse, N.M., Sept. 7th, 1915.  Editor Blade: Knowing that the friends of Joseph J. Slagel would like to know the particulars as to the cause of his death, I will give a short account of the same. He passed away at the Ladies Hospital in Deming, New Mexico, Sept. 6th, at 12:15 o’clock a.m., being conscious to the end. The immediate cause of his death was due to an explosion of gas Saturday afternoon at about 4:30 o’clock, while he was charging a prestolite tank for his automobile with acetylene gas.  The generator exploding with great force.  Joe was standing with his hands resting on the machine and received the full…of the shock, it breaking his…about three inches long…left side following around his body striking the spinal column. Although he was thrown several feet by the force of the blow he had gotten to his knees when reached by friends and later walked to his car with assistance and from the car into his home.  A physician was called at once and every care given him that was possible. Mr. Slagel moved to New Mexico last September one year ago and liked the country very much and enjoyed much better health than he had for several years past.  He had just completed a beautiful new home, of which he and his wife were justly very proud.  He was very much interested in his work of farming, and we had studied the problems of a new irrigated country together on many occasions. As a friend we had learned to love him.  As a neighbor to esteem him highly.  As a citizen he was above reproach. We will miss him.  His wife, father, mother, brother and sister have the sympathy of the entire community.

Yours very truly, C. C. Hollenback.”

Joseph Slagel Killed

Expires at Meisse, N.M., after being hurt when gun explodes–one arm torn off and both eyes.
Rev. and Mrs. Samuel Slagel, of this city, received a telegram from C. C. Hollenback early Sunday morning stating that their son, Joseph Slagel, had been terribly injured by the explosion of a gun.  The telegram bore the intelligence that his left arm had been torn away by the force of the explosion and that both eyes had been blown out.  Rev. and Mrs. Slagel left Sunday evening for Meisse, but another telegram was received here Sunday night stating that the injured man had passed away.  His parents, however, were not apprised of this fact until they reached their destination.

No other particulars than the above are obtainable at this time.  The remains are expected to arrive here today and the funeral will be held Sunday.

Joseph Slagel bought land near Meisse, N.M., about four years ago, and about two years ago he sold out his machine shop here and with his wife located on his ranch in the hopes of bettering his health.  He had one of the best pieces of land in that section.  He loved to hunt and stated before leaving here that he intended to put in his spare time at this sport, and it is thought perhaps that it was while on a hunting expedition the accident occurred.

Joseph Slagel Tombstone, Graceland Cemetery, Fairbury, Illinois