Amanuensis Monday, Blogging Prompts, Letters, Montgomery, Montgomery Line, Research, Wilson

Amanuensis Monday – Jobs Are Scarce

 

 

It’s interesting to note themes that repeat themselves in family history over time. This can be seen in the two letters I selected to transcribe, more or less at random. Grandpa Montgomery received a letter from Elta Grace, the youngest of his four sisters, in late August 1941. Though the youngest of the four Montgomery girls, Elta was thirteen years older than Grandpa. Both were born in August; when Elta wrote to him Grandpa would have just turned 40; Elta 53. Elta, with her husband William Gladstone Freeman, was then living in Van Nuys, California, and had just returned from a trip to Fort Collins, Colorado. Grandpa and Elta’s father was living there with his new wife (another letter written by Charles William Montgomery in July 1941 mentions Elta’s upcoming visit).

[Postmarked Van Nuys, Calif., Aug. 27, 1941; Addressed Mr. Lawrence Montgomery, Scottsbluff, Nebr.  Box 675; 3¢ stamp; Return address label on back flap:  W. G. Freeman, 14108 Victory, Van Nuys, Calif.]

Van Nuys, Calif.
Aug. 27, 41

Dear Lawrence & All:

We got home from our trip O.K. Everyone was well. Sure would like to have met you at Ft. Collins. There is lots of work around here now, especially at the Airplane plants. I don’t know about the pay. Some men get jobs at once; others are not so fortunate. I don’t know why. Will & Clyde have the same jobs as when we first came here. Once thing: here you can work outside the year round. Hope you are all well as are we.

Love
Elta

Of Will and Elta’s seven children, only four survived to adulthood. The Clyde Elta mentions is her only surviving son, Clyde Samuel Freeman, born November 29, 1911 in Brownell, Kansas. Her youngest child had been another son, William Emmett, born in 1930 but dying a year later. Twins Nina and Tina were Elta’s firstborn; Nina lived only 12 days, dying October 14, 1907, and Tina lived only three months. The four surviving children fell between the twins and baby William:  Laura Fern (b. December 6, 1908); Clyde; Maurine L. (b. October 4, 1913); and Dorothy Willa (b. December 21, 1916).   William, Sr., would live less than five years after his wife wrote to her baby brother, dying April 11, 1946. Elta lived another ten years after her husband and died April 4, 1956 in Northridge, California. They are buried in Inglewood Cemetery in Los Angeles.

Another letter, this one unfinished, focuses similarly on employment and on travel though it was written some thirty years later. It was written by Grandma Montgomery to her mother in March 1972. The Emma Satree Grandma mentions was her best friend while growing up and was two years older than Grandma. A webpage containing history on the Bad Nation District No. 19 school lists both Emma and “the Carl Wilsons” as early pupils.

Caldwell
March 1972

Dear Mother & Grandma; 

Just a few lines, I am feeling much better now. Spring has come at last. The sun is shining and the birds are singing again & I see some bees out. 

Mike & Linda Lea moved to Eugene, Oregon. Guess they haven’t got a job yet, but I sure hope they get one soon. Jobs are so scarce. Lots of people out of work everywhere.  

Pearl wrote and said she plans on going to So. Dakota in June. Sure glad if she can. We are planning on going through Montana and see Emma Satree (Seiverts). I haven’t seen her for 36 years. Do you remember when Mrs. Satree, Emma & you came up to our place when we lived in Winner and I was sick in bed before Marvin was born. Mrs. Satree said You take care of her, Montgomery.

Blogging Prompts, Friday's Faces From the Past, Montgomery, Montgomery Line

Friday’s Faces from the Past – From Our Nation’s Capital

This week’s unknown photo comes from the Rice photography studio in Washington, DC and again was found in Grandpa and Grandma Montgomery’s house. The only Washington connection of which I am aware is great-aunt Bessie (Montgomery) Boyland. The third of Grandpa Montgomery’s sisters, she was born December 20, 1886 in Mansfield, Illinois, and married Francis Marion Boyland between 1906-1907. Their daughter Helen was born the following year.

In 1910 Francis, Bessie, and Helen were in Grover, Colorado. By 1920 Bessie had moved to Washington, DC and was working as a clerk for the Treasury Department. Bessie is listed as a “boarder” and is living alone (where were Francis and Helen?). By 1930 she had moved to Los Angeles and was living at the Commodore Hotel and working as an auditor. But the question remains – is this Bessie, or another as-yet-unknown connection to our nation’s capital?